The Sculptor's Muse - the Art of being Ambidextrous

September 24, 2010

Being able to do your artwork well with both hands is a valuable trait.  I think more so for sculptors.  When you are right handed then sculpting the left side of the face is easy, but the nose gets in the way when your working on that right eye.  Solution: train yourself to use both hands equally well.  Though both hands are used in blocking out the figure, or a portrait, artists tend to gravitate to the stronger and more skilled hand to work on the details and refining facial features.  By forcing yourself to use the tool in your other hand, you will get as competent in your 'weaker' hand.  Of course it takes some discipline and time and if you have deadlines looming on commissions you may want to fight this battle at another time, but the freedom, speed and flow of a sculpture is greatly increased by being ambidextrous.  Another simple way to increase this trait is by doing simple everyday things with your less dominant hand,such as  eating, brushing your hair and using your toothbrush -( I wouldn't recommend shaving until you've gotten to a confident level of mastery.)  All these things will add up, and you will start seeing that you are becoming proficient with both hands in your artwork.  This also forces more synapses between your left and right sides of the brain, and for the artist that is equally valuable.  So keep working, ...on both sides.

"I am still learning"  - - - Michelangelo at age 87

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copyright 2019 Tracy H Sugg, Sculptor